As second Ebola infection recorded within the US myths abound

DOLO TOWN, LIBERIA - AUGUST 24:  A Liberian Ministry of Health worker checks people for Ebola symptoms at a checkpoint near the international airport on August 24, 2014 near Dolo Town, Liberia. The government has been slow to deliver sufficient food aid to the town of some 15,000 people, following an August 20 quarantine to stop the Ebola epidemic from spreading from the community of some 15,000 people, located near Liberia's international airport. The military is stopping residents from leaving the area. Local Ministry of Health personnel say they have sent 20 sick people in the previous days to the Doctors Without Borders (MSF), treatment center for to be tested for Ebola.  (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
John Moore,  Getty Images News                                                                                                     Getty Imagesˇ

 The world is currently experiencing the worst Ebola outbreak on record. It started in Guinea in December 2013 and has since spread to four other countries in West Africa. On September 30, a patient was diagnosed in the United States for the first time. Thomas Eric Duncan left Liberia on September 19 and arrived in Dallas on September 20. Four days later, he began feeling ill; the following night, he went to Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital. Duncan died on Wednesday, October 8th at 7:51 a.m.

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Rutgers University community members braved the threat of rain to make the 2014 event a success
Rutgers University community members braved the threat of rain to make the 2014 “Walk for Literacy and Health” a success. A major focus of this year’s walk was how to respond to the Ebola epidemic battering West Africa

New Jersey activists including a coalition of Rutgers students, faculty, alumni and New Brunswick community members, braved the inclement weather on Saturday, October 11th to make the G.O.Y.A Project’s 2014 “Walk for Literacy and Health” a success.

Keynote speaker on the health dimension was Dr. Mafudia Suaray, who grew up in Sierra Leone, West Africa. She started her college education at the country’s only medical school in the shadows of  Sierra Leone’s brutal  11 year civil war. Under threat of their lives, her family was forced to flee Sierra Leone in 1997. Nearly two decades later she now specializes in Family Medicine and Community Health and works as an Instructor in the Department of Family and Community Medicine at the Rutgers-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School.

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Rutgers-Robert Wood Johnson Hospital community’s Zumba dance evening to support anti-Ebola efforts

Dora Goodwill, Carla Boyle (Director, Perinatal Services), Teresa Damito and Malou Torralba.
Dora Goodwill, Carla Boyle (Director, Perinatal Services), Myrna Young (Philippine Nurses Association) and Teresa Damito.

New Brunswick, New Jersey.- Members of the Rutgers-Robert Wood Johnson Hospital community are rallying to support efforts in combating the spread of the Ebola virus in West Africa. Spearheaded by members of the Perinatal Services at the hospital in collaboration with the Filipino-American Nurses Association at the hospital, on Thursday evening of September 25th there will be a Zumba dance evening featuring line dancing and ballroom dancing from 6 pm to 8 pm in the Arline and Henry Schwartzman Courtyard at the hospital.

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Ebola cases doubling every three weeks now

The number of Ebola cases is increasing much more rapidly than the World Health Organization (WHO) had projected, especially in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, collectively the West African epicenter of the outbreak. Villagers are complicating containment efforts with police reporting health-care workers in Sierra Leone coming under attack while trying to bury victims.

    • Total Case Count: 5347
    • Total Deaths: 2630
    • CDC and World Health Organization updates (Sept. 18, 2014)

    United Nations officials say now that the outbreak has moved from rural to urban areas, the number of cases is doubling in about three weeks. Ebola is spread person-to-person through bodily fluids.

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Economic slowdown expected for Sierra Leone, Guinea and Liberia

World Bank analysts estimate that if the disease is not contained shortly, problems with food shortages, panic buying and speculation will continue to wrack the already-fragile economies of the affected countries.

A man sells buckets used for washing hands on a street in downtown Monrovia, September 18, 2014. The World Bank has predicted that the Ebola outbreak will cost Liberia $228 million if it is not handled soon. Reuters/ James Giahyue
A man sells buckets used for washing hands on a street in downtown Monrovia, September 18, 2014. The World Bank has predicted that the Ebola outbreak will cost Liberia $228 million if it is not handled soon. Reuters/ James Giahyue

Local governments, foreign states and international organizations have already spent millions of dollars and will require billions to contain the largest Ebola outbreak in history. But these numbers are small in comparison to the economic slowdown expected for Sierra Leone, Guinea and Liberia as commerce grinds to a halt while increasing uneasiness begins to affect the markets.

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Ebola: Economic Impact Already Serious; Could Be “Catastrophic”

Sep 17, 2014: http://www.worldbank.org/ – A World Bank Group analysis of the Ebola epidemic released today finds that, beyond the terrible toll in human suffering, the continuing surge in the deadly virus in the three worst-affected countries – Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone –could deal a potentially catastrophic economic blow to the already fragile states.

World Bank President Jim Yong Kim says that the largest economic effects of the crisis are not as a result of the direct costs (mortality, morbidity, caregiving, and the associated losses to working days) but rather those resulting from aversion behavior driven by fear of contagion.

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